Author Archive

2010: Will It Be ‘The Year of the IMT’?

Eight years after the 9/11 terrorist attacks U.S. planners say that the nation is now “better” prepared than it was in 2001 – but not yet totally prepared. What they do not say is that total preparedness is a philosophical as well as financial impossibility. Continued improvements are the second

NIMS & ICS: The Next Level

  The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) resumed the “next” series of its NIMS (National Incident Management System) Incident Command System (ICS) training in August with the delivery of eight ICS position-specific Train-the-Trainer (T-t-T) programs in College Station, Texas, where the Texas Forest Service (TFS) is headquartered – on the

NIMS: Not a Once and Done Proposition

The “”revolutionary era”” of U.S. homeland security started with the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001. A new era, focused on the maintenance and upgrading of hard-earned responder skills, is about to begin.

Changes and Clarifications – NIMS Upgrade Released

On 18 December 2008, long-awaited revisions to the National Incident Management System (NIMS) – officially described as an “upgrade” by the former acting director of the NIMS Integration Center, Albert Fluman – were published by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and are now being implemented.The effort to improve the

NIMS Preparedness and Resource Management

One of the core components of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) is Resource Management. Preparedness is another. The other principal components are: Communications and Information Management; Command and Management; and On-Going Management and Maintenance. Because both Resource Management and Preparedness affect and are affected by the other NIMS components

NIMS Training Plans: An Effort Without End

From George Washington’s days to the present, U.S. leaders have adhered to the credo that “Eternal Vigilance” is “the price of freedom.” Today, those wise words of warning are applicable, with only a slight modification, to the efforts of federal, state, and local officials seeking to meet National Incident Management

Incident Action Planning – A Step-by-Step Process

The writing of an Incident Action Plan (IAP) for what is called an “expanding incident” is a long, complex, but also comprehensive process designed to clearly identify incident objectives, strategies, and tactics based on fundamental decisions made by the incident commander (IC) – who is responsible for establishing the incident

Incident Action Planning: Staying the Course

Emergency responders throughout the United States have been working diligently since 2006 to meet the most current compliance criteria for completing intermediate and advanced Incident Command System (ICS) training.  The ICS training stipulated in NIMS (the National Incident Management System) compliance criteria includes the course “Intermediate Incident Command System for

The Whys and Wherefores of NIMS-Compliant Training

The National Incident Management System training guidelines provide an unprecedented opportunity to improve and expand first-responder and emergency-responder capabilities – but some confusion continues about exactly what is required.

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Article Out Loud – The Race to Interoperability

The Boston Marathon Bombing demonstrated the dedication, commitment, and strength of those who responded that day. The lessons learned from that event continue to strengthen community resilience as participants gather to focus on building interoperability within and between jurisdictions.

Article Out Loud – Local Security: The Forgotten Factor in Relief Operations

  By Joseph W. Trindal, An Article Out Loud Flashback from Domestic Preparedness, originally published on February 24, 2010. The 2010 earthquake in Haiti exposed many weaknesses in the local infrastructure. Learn how security gaps and concerns presented even more problems for the relief effort. Narrated by Elisa DeLeon. Listen

Article Out Loud – A Failure To Over-Communicate

  By Terry Hastings, An Article Out Loud Flashback from Domestic Preparedness, originally published on May 10, 2017. Emergency managers (and others) often fail to fully engage and educate the whole community. This 2017 article discusses the need to over-communicate and explore new ways to educate people. Narrated by Elisa

Article Out Loud – Healthcare and Public Health Sector Perspectives

The Healthcare and Public Health Sector is one of 16 sectors identified as critical infrastructure under the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency. According to the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, National Health Expenditures (NHE) accounted for $4.3 trillion, or 18.3% of the U.S. gross domestic product. The HPH Sector

Article Out Loud – Information Technology Sector Perspectives

The Information Technology Sector is one of 16 sectors identified as critical infrastructure under the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency. Domestic Preparedness invited subject matter experts to answer questions about this sector, including how the sector and its interdependencies can affect any community.

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