Editor's Message: 6-Month Review - June 2022

The first half of 2022 certainly has been busy! As businesses fully reopen and people around the world begin to explore life in the new normal, the Domestic Preparedness Journal has been exploring its new normal as well. The journal was launched in 1998 to bridge the communication and collaboration gaps between disciplines and across jurisdictions. While the journal has now been entrusted to a new steward, the mission of bridging gaps across disciplines and jurisdictions remains the same. 

USDA Announces New SARS-COV-2 Research Funding Opportunity Through the American Rescue Plan Act

he U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has announced it will commit up to $24 million for research grants through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and the National Science Foundation Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases program. These grants will support research that directly aligns with APHIS’ American Rescue Plan strategic framework and will support APHIS and its One Health partners’ efforts to identify risks and plan effective interventions to prevent transmission of SARS-CoV-2 at the human-animal interface and to prevent impacts to the food supply.

Working Together: Partnership, Training, Funding & Tolerance

When community stakeholders work together to prepare for emergencies and disasters, they will be better prepared and have more resources to face whatever threats, risks, and hazards are in their future. Four key aspects to consider when building community resilience are addressed in this June edition of the Domestic Preparedness Journal: public-private partnerships, training, funding, and tolerance.
micrometer

Building Capability: Zero Tolerance vs. Acceptability

A tool designed with zero tolerance would not be able to function efficiently or effectively. Likewise, taking a zero-tolerance approach to emergency preparedness and response has led to some problematic policies and procedures. This article explains why building in some level of acceptability would make policies and procedures more effective and communities more resilient.

How The Best Get Better: Partnerships & A Trifecta Disaster

Japan is more prepared for future disasters due to communications and annual investments into exercises and drills with local and international partners. Tokyo Disney Resort leveraged private-public partnerships to increase preparedness in employees, guests, business services, critical infrastructure facilities, and government stakeholders to manage future disruptions caused by natural disasters. A private-public partnership helped align business needs and supported risk-information decision-making during a complex, large-scale disaster.

DHS S&T Publishes the Resilient PNT Reference Architecture and Update to Conformance Framework

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) has published the Resilient Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Reference Architecture. The document incorporates modern cybersecurity principles to provide concepts and examples for building Next Generation Resilient PNT systems against current and future threats.
Translate »